Photo: King avriel. Words: Pasteur/King avriel

Photo: King avriel. Words: Pasteur/King avriel

Meanwhile, somewhere in LA, as ceaseless battle against time continues, as we fight to create and express our feelings in such sophisticated ways, King avriel might have just won hers.  She kind of makes this “making-it in the male dominated industry” biz we hear about from our womenfolk look so effortless, plus she has a body that can make a grown man weep.

Her lyrics are incredibly honest, they easily inspire sympathy as she narrates her experiences and emotions.  Her desire to express herself beyond the stereotypes is more important than her desire to stand out.  

Here is what she had to say about “180”

“I spend a lot of time thinking about stereotypes in music and how I can subversively challenge them. As was the case with the Caricatures video, I feel it is important to look in the mirror at how my own experiences, as a woman and as an artist, are stereotypical. 

180 is my attempt to relive a period in my life when I felt I was not my own person, just a giant cliché — an attention-starved, rebellious girl trying to navigate and find my place in this male-dominated industry. I felt the best way for you to understand where I’m coming from and how it’s shaped me was to chronicle some of my teenage “rites of passage.” While those pivotal moments seemingly gave me more freedom and maybe even some moderate success, they only sunk me deeper into a psychological enslavement, cemented in the materialism, vanity, and predatory nature of LA. I think that story, juxtaposed with the trap elements in the beat — a cliché in and of itself — sets up a nice contrast that hopefully makes you think about the culture we’ve all grown up in.”

180 is produced by TheOnlyOnesLeft